brutereason

Once again, I am angry and ashamed again to be Irish and scared to be an Irish woman. Except, of course, I’m white and middle class and this will never happen to me. I would end up going to England for my abortion as thousands of other women each year do. Just like the Irish government wants so that it doesn’t have to actually deal with the problem. Instead, the women who are affected are those that are too sick to travel (Savita Hallapanavar), those that are prevented from travelling (the 1992 x case) and this girl who couldn’t leave the country because of her immigration status.

This is a girl, as vulnerable as it is possible to be, who went to the government, apparently in fear for her life from her family, after being raped, carrying a child she was clearly not capable of taking care of and feeling suicidal. And my government turned around and forced her to carry that child for 17 weeks while she went on hunger strike. Because of prejudice against immigrants, mental illness and women and fear of alienating politically conservative voters.

And you can bet, once again, nothing will change and this will keep on happening here and thousands of women, who should be treated at home will keep on travelling to England and Europe, like they always have. And abortion will be swept under the rug like it always is and there will be more quiet desperation or unnecessary risks to women who have to travel for medical procedures they should be entitled to at home. And of course even more women and girls forced to give birth here because they don’t have the resources or ability to leave the country.

To the girl forced to give birth, I’m so sorry, you deserved better. To those who forced her into that position, I hope you are ashamed of yourselves.

wanweird-of-an-argonaut
ucresearch:

Should you be afraid of the Ebola threat?
If you’re able to read this post, chances are you don’t have to worry. Arthur Reingold, head of epidemiology at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health, puts fears of an Ebola epidemic to rest in an interview with Vox.

VOX: Some airlines are enacting travel bans since the outbreak. Are they justified then?
Arthur Reingold: The virus is not transmitted through coughing and sneezing, or through sitting next to someone on a bus or the like. The idea that the virus can somehow mutate and become more readily transmissible from person to person through coughing or sneezing—those are Hollywood scenarios. The idea that Ebola can become more readily transmissible through casual contact is unrealistic and not something we are concerned about.

Read the interview with Art Reingold on the Ebola epidemic

ucresearch:

Should you be afraid of the Ebola threat?


If you’re able to read this post, chances are you don’t have to worry. Arthur Reingold, head of epidemiology at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health, puts fears of an Ebola epidemic to rest in an interview with Vox.

VOX: Some airlines are enacting travel bans since the outbreak. Are they justified then?

Arthur Reingold: The virus is not transmitted through coughing and sneezing, or through sitting next to someone on a bus or the like. The idea that the virus can somehow mutate and become more readily transmissible from person to person through coughing or sneezing—those are Hollywood scenarios. The idea that Ebola can become more readily transmissible through casual contact is unrealistic and not something we are concerned about.

Read the interview with Art Reingold on the Ebola epidemic

brutereason
Why is women’s writing invariably reduced to the personal, or dismissed as “confessional”? This week, my book Unspeakable Things is published in the UK and in the standard set of interviews you do when you have a book out – in which you turn up in a clean T-shirt and try not to sound stupid – that’s the one question that has come up every time. Why do you write about “personal issues”? Why do you include your own experiences when you speak about sex, power and politics – and such intimate experiences, too? Why do you talk about addiction and date rape and television? Aren’t you being too “provocative”? Aren’t you being too “confessional”, as women always are?

The first point is that when men write about their experiences in a political context, it’s never called “confessional” – it’s just “literature”, or a “memoir”. The second is that male political experience is never coded as male – it’s just universal truth.